The word that most frightens abortion advocates? "Texas."


The abortion movement has been in a state of panic for quite some time. With the rate at which they are losing traction in every arena, abortion advocates are perpetuallyin survival mode, unable to make any real strides of their own in almost any state. They are too busy trying (unsuccessfully) to put out the fires set ablaze by Pro-Lifers. And in their frenzy and fear, one word stands alone among the rest, having power to send a shudder down the collective anti-Life spine: TEXAS.

The abortion camp’s fear of Texas is directly proportionate to the outrageousness of its response to the pro-woman and Pro-Life victories that were won on our soil over the last two years. We have seen radicals of every variety: from riotous fauxminists who dramatically evoke a history that never was, to, well, more riotous fauxminists who seem enraged that “abortion on-demand and without apology” is not Texas’ state motto.

A New York Times article released over the summer encapsulates the utter antithesis to their movement that is Texas:

I wondered whether mainstream abortion rights groups in the United States might ever encourage this emphasis [as she saw in Texas]on do-it-yourself [abortion]options. It would be a major shift…

The article’s author is referring to the spike in DIY abortion rhetoric that has enveloped Texas ever since the passage of HB2. Abortionists like Lester Minto and Big Abortion beneficiary Amy Hagstrom Miller boast that the off-label usages of certain pharmaceuticals is the next big thing in the Texas abortion scene. In short: they fully support any means of killing preborn children, no matter how dangerous an abortion method may be to the mother.

Hagstrom Miller has suggested that she may invest in so-called “miscarriage management” clinics (in which she would essentially take advantage of and encourage the plight of women who abuse the abortion-inducing drugs), while Minto claims to have already shifted focus to “miscarriage management” (he can’t commit abortions legally since he does not possess hospital admitting privileges).

Because we have masterfully translated public opinion into legislation, giving Pro-Life Texas a voice in-action, our state is the paradigm of fear for abortion advocates – not just in the US, but across the world.  Radical abortion supporters do not acknowledge the democratic nature of the victory, however, choosing instead to relay the passage of Pro-Life legislation as an event that somehow occurred in the absence of women’s involvement. The fact, however, is that the majority of women in Texas – and in the entire nation – oppose the abortion practices that HB2 outlawed. HB2, therefore, is what women want. And what women deserve.

 There is a reason so many states look to Texas when they craft their own Pro-Life bills: our successes have withstood a hailstorm of attack from the loud-but-outnumbered abortion camp. When Pro-Life Texans say, “Don’t mess with Texas,” they mean what they say. 


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