HHS denies abortion-inducing pill to be sold over the counter


The Obama administration and the Department of Health and Human Services made the right decision Wednesday to the block the over-the-counter sale of Plan B One-Step to minor girls.  Texas Right to Life applauds their decision to protect young girls from this harmful abortion-inducing drug.  

Plan B and other forms of “emergency contraception” state that the drug “will not harm an existing pregnancy” but will rather “prevent pregnancy” after unprotected sex.  However, the abortion industry and the manufacturers of emergency contraception claim that a pregnancy starts when the newly formed human being attaches to the uterine wall – not at the moment of fertilization.   

Plan B can be taken up to three days after fertilization, when a new human being has already been created.  With a similar composition as the chemical abortion drug RU-486 and warnings hidden within the product information, Plan B can without a doubt terminate a pregnancy.  The uterus becomes a hostile environment, making the newly formed human being unable to survive.  

Allowing girls to obtain this potential abortifacient without a doctor’s prescription or parental approval places young girls in an extremely dangerous position.  Had the HHS approved the FDA’s recommendation, it would have granted unmitigated access to the potential abortion pill to not only young girls, but to young teen boys who could use it in a violent or coercive manner on young girls.  It would also allow young girls to obtain the pills without being medically examined for abuse or STDs.  

NOW president Terry O’Neill called the decision a “stunning betrayal of women,” accusing President Obama of “playing politics with the lives of women and girls.”

Pro-abortion groups are angry with the decision.  NARAL Pro-Choice America president Nancy Keenan called the choice “a failure to deliver change” and expressed “profound disappointment with the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ decision” in an official press release.  

In an official statement, Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius, defended her decision:

It is common knowledge that there are significant cognitive and behavioral differences between older adolescent girls and the youngest girls of reproductive age, which I believe are relevant to making this determination…because the data submitted for this product are inadequate to support approval in that they do not establish that prescription dispensing requirements should be eliminated for all ages.


As of now, the secretary’s decision stands.  There is no word on whether Obama will cave to his pro-abortion allies and reverse the judgment of Secretary Sebelius.  


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